Ortlieb Heavy Duty Dry Bag PS 490 35L (Lime w/ valve) Follow-up

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  1. Reply

    “T-Bags” ????? Just ordered a T-Bags “Super T”. Any one use the T-Bag brand ? What do ya think ? It’ll be going on the back of a 2008 Road King…I already have the luggage rack.

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    1. Reply

      They are good bags. Well built and pretty damn dry.
      My brother in law got one for Father’s day (I think it was) a couple years ago. He was happier than a kid at Christmas.
      Great storage space, removable top bag.

      For me, I think it’s a little large. It would be easy to get too much weight up too high unless you watch how you pack.

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  2. Reply

    How Do You Dry Fruit? You know how there’s dried fruit in grocery stores. I was wondering if you can dry fruit yourself and how you do it if you can?
    Could I buy a food dehydrator at a grocery store like lunds, cub foods, rainbow, etc?

    How much do they generally cost?

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    1. Reply

      It takes a while but it dries the fruit. ?

      1. Select the Fruit

      Use only blemish-free fruits that are fully ripe but not overly ripe.

      2. Prepare the Fruit

      Wash, pit and slice the fruit. The smaller the pieces, the quicker they will dry. But keep all pieces uniform in size so they'll dry at the same time.

      3. Pretreating

      To preserve the color of the fruit, blanch or dip the fruit slices before drying them. There are several ways to do this. As indicated below, some methods work better for some fruits than others.

      Blanching (apricots, apples)
      Put slices in a steamer (or a colander suspended in a pot of boiling water) for five minutes then place fruit in ice water to stop the cooking. Drain and dry on towels.
      Ascorbic acid dip (all fruits)
      2 tbsp ascorbic acid or 5 1-gram crushed vitamin C tabs and 1 quart water

      Pectin dip (peaches, berries, cherries)
      Mix 1 box of powdered pectin with 1 cup water. Boil together for 1 minute, then add 1/2 cup sugar and enough cold water to make 2 cups.

      Honey dip (bananas, peaches, pineapples)
      Mix 3 cups waters and 1 cup sugar. Heat and then add 1 cup honey. Stir well.

      Juice dip (peaches, apples, bananas)
      Combine 1 quart pineapple juice, 1 quart lukewarm water and 1/4 cup bottled lemon juice.

      4. Drying

      Sun Drying
      a) Spread on screen for two to four days, turning slices over half way through the drying process.
      b) Bring inside at night to keep dew from collecting on the fruit.
      c) This method works best in climates with 100 degree heat and low humidity. Otherwise use caution, or try the oven.
      Oven Drying
      a) Place fruit directly on racks or first spread 100 percent cotton sheet or cheesecloth over oven racks. b) Preheat oven to 145 degrees, propping door open with wooden spoon to allow steam to escape.
      c) Allow 4 to 12 hours to dry the fruit.
      d) Food should be dry but pliable when cool. Test a few pieces to see if the batch is ready

      5. Post Drying

      Put food in a big dry open pot in a warm, dry, airy location. Stir once or twice a day for 10 days to two weeks.

      6. Pasteurize

      If you want to store the dried fruit for any great length of time, it is best to pasteurize the slices to destroy any insect eggs. To do this, when drying is complete, freeze the fruit for several days at zero degrees in a deep freeze (the freezer compartment of a refrigerator won't do), or heat in a 175 degree oven for 10-15 minutes

      7. Storage

      Store in airtight ziplock bags or glass containers kept inside paper bag to protect from light. Store in cool dry place. Since a refrigerator is cool and moist, keep the dried fruit there only in the heat of summer, but make sure the package is air tight.

      I hope this helps!

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  3. Reply

    How Can I Clean Self Cleaning Oven Racks? It says take them out so i do but the racks look awful but we got a clean oven.

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    1. Reply

      Put them into a plastic bag and squirt ammonia on them. Tie the bag shut and let it be until morning. Then put them into the bathtub and use an SOS scouring pad and warm water. They’ll clean up like magic. Rinse well and dry.

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  4. Reply

    Okay Everyone, I Have A Bag Of Dried Fruit In The Pantry And Looking For A Way To Use It. See Details TY!? Hiya
    I have a pouch of dried blueberries, raspberries and blackberries.
    I need a way to use it. I can’t stand the gummy texture ( its yet another one my pet peeves, I hate things that stick in my teeth)
    So, I was thinking maybe reconstituteing and using in a cobbler or something. If so, how to do it properly, the whole point is, I do not want to waste it.
    Can you help? I’m not stuck on cobbler, so anything you come up with will be considered.
    TY

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    1. Reply

      Rehydrating dried fruits
      http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1216/is_v176/ai_4261216

      raspberry bread
      http://homecookingiswhatilike.blogspot.com/2007/02/berry-bread.html
      ——–
      BERRY BREAD Makes 2 loaves

      3 c All-purpose flour
      1 tb Cinnamon
      1 tb Baking soda
      1 t Salt
      1 1/4 c Vegetable oil
      3 Eggs
      1 c Sugar
      2 c Fresh strawberries/blueberry
      1 c Chopped nuts

      Combine the flour, cinnamon, baking soda, and salt; set aside.

      In large bowl of electric mixer, combine oil, eggs, and sugar, mixing well. Gradually add dry ingredients to creamed mixture, stirring until just moistened.

      Stir in berries and nuts. Spoon mixture into 2 greased and floured loaf pans.

      Bake at 1 hour at 350 deg F or until tested done.

      Cool in pans 10 minutes; remove to wire racks to cool completely.

      These freeze well; make multiple loaves with extra berries.

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  5. Reply

    How Long Does It Take For Sand To Dry? I am looking for the time it takes to dry out.

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    1. Reply

      It depends on how much sand there is, and how much of it can be exposed to dry air.

      Why are you asking?

      I use sand on my driveway and walkway in the winter, and always have a problem because the sand I get is from a garden center comes in plastic bags and is stored outside. Often, when I get it, it is rock solid, so I break it up, put portions of it in cloth bags, and then put the cloth bags on a rack so that the air can circulate around them, then I turn them every day or half day. It usually takes about three or four days for a bucket of sand to dry this way.

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  6. Reply

    How Do You Dry Habeneros Naturally So They Don’t Rot Or Mold.? In addition, are the leaves of hot pepper plants useful or anything or edible?

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    1. Reply

      “….Drying Peppers with a Dehydrator

      Slice your peppers in half. If desired, remove the seeds, stem, and membranes from each pepper half.

      Lay the halves, cut side down, in single layers on the dehydrator screens.
      Take your dehydrator to a well-ventilated area. The fumes from very hot peppers will make your eyes water, and since this process can take several days, you’ll want to make sure that the location is closed off and well ventilated. Outdoors would be even better, if possible.
      Let the peppers sit in the dehydrator for several days at about 100 degrees Fahrenheit, checking to see how they’re progressing. The peppers must be very dry before they’re done, as any moisture left over will invite mold and parasites.
      .
      Drying Peppers in the Oven

      Prepare your peppers the same way as you would when using a dehydrator. You can arrange them directly on your oven racks if desired, or use baking sheets.

      Put the peppers in the oven and heat to 100 to 135 degrees Fahrenheit. Leave the oven door open a bit to provide air circulation.
      If you’re using baking sheets, turn the peppers frequently to provide even drying.
      Allow the peppers to dry well, with no discernible moisture left over.
      .
      Air Drying Peppers

      Leave the peppers whole, and leave the stems attached.

      Using a long, sharp needle and strong thread or fishing line, string the peppers together. Leave enough room for the air to circulate between each pepper.
      Hang your stringed peppers in a warm, dry place, preferably in direct sunlight.
      Peppers may take a few weeks to dry completely.
      Peppers dried in the dehydrator or oven will lose some of their color and the seeds will fall, while air-dried peppers will retain both their color and their very spicy seeds. When peppers are completely dried, store them in an airtight container or zippered plastic bag in a cool, dry place. Dried peppers can be ground and used as spices, or you can soak them in water to rehydrate them, and use them in soups and sauces….”
      ——————————————–
      “…..Habaneros thrive in hot weather. As with all peppers, the habanero does well in an area with good morning sun and in soil with an acidity level around 5-6 pH. The habanero should be watered only when dry. Overly moist soil and roots will produce bitter-tasting peppers.

      Habanero bushes are good candidates for a container garden. They can live many years in pots or other growing containers at proper temperature.

      The habanero is a perennial flowering plant, meaning that with proper care and growing conditions, it can produce flowers (and thus fruit) for many years. However, in temperate climates it is treated as an annual when planted in the ground, dying each winter and being replaced the next spring. In tropical and sub-tropical regions, the habanero, like other chiles, will produce year round. As long as conditions are favorable, the plant will set fruit continuously……..”
      .
      I couldn’t find anything about eating or using the leaves for anything.

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  7. Reply

    How Do I Dry Out A Banana? I want to dry a banana like the slices you get in muesli. Any ideas?

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    1. Reply

      1. Select the Fruit

      Use only blemish-free fruits that are fully ripe but not overly ripe.

      2. Prepare the Fruit

      Wash, pit and slice the fruit. The smaller the pieces, the quicker they will dry. But keep all pieces uniform in size so they'll dry at the same time.

      3. Pretreating

      To preserve the color of the fruit, blanch or dip the fruit slices before drying them. There are several ways to do this. As indicated below, some methods work better for some fruits than others.

      Blanching (apricots, apples)
      Put slices in a steamer (or a colander suspended in a pot of boiling water) for five minutes then place fruit in ice water to stop the cooking. Drain and dry on towels.
      Ascorbic acid dip (all fruits)
      2 tbsp ascorbic acid or 5 1-gram crushed vitamin C tabs and 1 quart water

      Pectin dip (peaches, berries, cherries)
      Mix 1 box of powdered pectin with 1 cup water. Boil together for 1 minute, then add 1/2 cup sugar and enough cold water to make 2 cups.

      Honey dip (bananas, peaches, pineapples)
      Mix 3 cups waters and 1 cup sugar. Heat and then add 1 cup honey. Stir well.

      Juice dip (peaches, apples, bananas)
      Combine 1 quart pineapple juice, 1 quart lukewarm water and 1/4 cup bottled lemon juice.

      4. Drying

      Sun Drying
      a) Spread on screen for two to four days, turning slices over half way through the drying process.
      b) Bring inside at night to keep dew from collecting on the fruit.
      c) This method works best in climates with 100 degree heat and low humidity. Otherwise use caution, or try the oven.
      Oven Drying
      a) Place fruit directly on racks or first spread 100 percent cotton sheet or cheesecloth over oven racks. b) Preheat oven to 145 degrees, propping door open with wooden spoon to allow steam to escape.
      c) Allow 4 to 12 hours to dry the fruit.
      d) Food should be dry but pliable when cool. Test a few pieces to see if the batch is ready

      5. Post Drying
      Put food in a big dry open pot in a warm, dry, airy location. Stir once or twice a day for 10 days to two weeks.

      6. Pasteurize
      if you want to store the dried fruit for any great length of time, it is best to pasteurize the slices to destroy any insect eggs. To do this, when drying is complete, freeze the fruit for several days at zero degrees in a deep freeze (the freezer compartment of a refrigerator won't do), or heat in a 175 degree oven for 10-15 minutes

      7. Storage
      Store in airtight ziplock bags or glass containers kept inside paper bag to protect from light. Store in cool dry place. Since a refrigerator is cool and moist, keep the dried fruit there only in the heat of summer, but make sure the package is air tight

      View Comment
  8. Reply

    Can I Dry Oatmeal Cookies In An Oven? Im a dude…made myself some -is it ok to leave tem on wax paper in oven rack? (dark,cold,closed)

    i dont want flies or notin messin em up…will it effect it? sorry my manliness makes me suck @ cookin

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    1. Reply

      The cookies will get drier and harder as a result if you leave them in the oven. if that’s okay with you it’s fine. if you prefer to keep them fresher and safe from bugs put them a plastic container that has a lid, zip lock or other close-able bag, in a paper bag rolled up, a plate covered with plastic wrap or foil, a bowl with a plate on top.

      View Comment
    • Bob
    • February 26, 2014
    Reply

    Does Water Stain Sleeping Bags? Whenever I happen to get water on a sleeping bag and it isn’t dried like right away, it seems to have dark spots on it as if the water has made stains. I know this is crazy but it would appear like I have dark spots all over my sleeping bags because of water even after months. Can someone disprove this? My sleeping bags aren’t really anything fancy.

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    1. Reply

      I suppose water could stain a sleeping bag, but you can wash the sleeping bag and that will get rid of the stain.

      Wash it in warm water and detergent. Then hang it to air dry. If you have a clothes line or a fence, you can dry it there. If not, I drape sleeping bags and comforters over a coat rack to dry.

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  9. Reply

    How To Dry Figs?

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    1. Reply

      Figs dry nicely. First, though, you must let them ripen fully to develop their flavor. And the only way to know that they're fully mature is to let them drop from the tree. Harvest them quickly, wash and dry them, and cut them in half. Place them on a drying surface, skin-side down. (The drying surface may be the rack from a dehydrator, cooling racks that you intend to put in the oven, a clean screen or wooden frame with a clean, old sheet stapled to it for drying the figs in the sun, etc.)

      If you plan to dry them in the sun, you need warm days with little humidity. A warm, dry breeze circulating around the figs for two days is ideal. Bring your trays in before the evening dew. To discourage bugs, you can prop a layer of cheesecloth up across the trays.

      You can also dry the figs in the oven, but you want a temperature no higher than 140?F (60?C). And 115? to 120? (45?C to 50?C) is actually best for fruit. Many ovens cannot be set that low, however, so you may need to find some absolutely safe way to prop the oven door open a little to allow the excess heat to vent. Some people let you go as high as 160?F (70?C), but at that temperature the fruit may actually begin to cook, which is not your goal. Or the surface will dry out before the interior, trapping moisture inside, and leading to the development of mold. At a temperature around 120?, the figs will take between 8 and 12 hours to dry. If you use a dehydrator, follow the manufacturers' instructions.

      After the figs are dry and leathery, you should "pasteurize" them to kill any insects that may be lurking in the cracks and crevices. You can either heat them in the oven for 10 to 15 minutes at 175?F (80?C) or put them in freezer bags and freeze them for at least four days. (The freezer method is a little less destructive to vitamins, minerals and texture). Afterwards, if you keep them in the refrigerator, they'll last for 18 to 24 months. In the freezer, they'll last for 5 to 8 years.

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