Special: Schwalbe Furious Fred 29 in. Pacestar Tire

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  1. Reply

    Difference Between Tubeless Tyres And Tubed Tyres? Which one is good for a small hatch back car? Please tell the advantages and disadvantages of both.

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    1. Reply

      Tube tyres are the ones that are the conventional tyres and have been used ever since the inception of tyres themselves, so they have a tube within the tyre. On the other hand the tubeless tyres are pneumatic ones (based on air) and do not have an inner tube.

      Advantage of tubeless tyres is that the absence of inner tube means lower unsprung weight (weight that lies below the suspensions) and hence lower rolling resistance, lesser drag, improved fuel economy etc. Most importantly with tubless tyres even if your tyre puctures you don’t have to stop by to fix the puncture immediately, you can just drive with it and stop to get it fixed the moment you find someone to. In tube tyres the moment your tyre punctures you have to stop by and get it fixed, you can’t afforf to drive with it, cuz your tube can burst instantly and with that you will have to change the entire tyre which invovles the cost of buying a new tyre for a few thousands.
      The disadvantage is that tubeless tyres can wear out easily.

      However most cars now come fitted with tubeless tyres, this technology has come from west obviously and spreading like fire in india…

      I would recommend tubeless tyres as they do not come along with the fear of tube damage even if you to drive them a few kms to get em your car to the mechanic..

      All the best

      tavleen
      mycarmychoice.com

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  2. Reply

    Road Bike Tire/tube Question? I have 700 x 23 tires on my road bike and just bought new tubes. I realized that I purchased the 700 x 25-32c tubes. Can I still use them?
    Thanks for your help!

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    1. Reply

      Yes,you can still use them,normally the tube size is 18 to 28 mm so you’ll have no problems with these,it’ll be fine.the size differance is only 2mm,thats nothing to worry about,when you blow up your tyre the tyre will stretch about 1 mm if you put more than 110psi in them,i’m assuming your a “roadie” cyclist.i have used a 25 tube with a 23 tyre with no trouble.

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    • Mac
    • February 7, 2014
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    Road Bike Tire Tube? ? So I have had to replace the tube for one of my road bike tires like 3 times in the last couple of months. Should I keep replacing them or is there a stronger tire that I can purchase? What are my options people? Thanks in advance!

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    1. Reply

      What is causing your flats? Look at the tube. If there are two small holes on the inside, then you’ve got a “snakebite” pinch flat. To prevent these, check your tire pressures before every ride. I always inflate my tires to the max pressure indicated on the tire sidewall. It takes just seconds to do this with a floor pump that has a pressure gauge. If you are still getting pinch flats, you may want to consider getting a tire that has more distance between the rim and the tread. This measurement is not the same even for tires with the same nominal size.

      If you have other punctures, check out things like a faulty rim strip, a protruding spoke end, or an object in your tire. Always mounting the tire so that the brand label is centered on the valve stem keeps the positioning consistent to help track down problems like this.

      Finally, flats seem to come in bunches. I didn’t have one for more then a year. Then, I got three in fairly quick succession. I hope I’ve “used up” all my flats for this year!

      HTH

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  3. Reply

    Cyclocross Bicycle Tyres, Inner Tubes? Are their inner tubes different from road racing bike tyres inner tubes?

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    1. Reply

      Not really, they are 700 size tubes, you just need to make sure the tube size range is ok for the tire, ie. don’t use a 700-18/23 tube for a 700-32 tire, use a 700-28/32 tube.

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  4. Reply

    Question On Self-sealing Tire Tubes And Tire Liners? When a self-sealing inner tire tube is punctured (up to 1/8″), it is said to reseal itself. But does it reseal the puncture for good or does it just give me enough time to get to a place where I can change / patch the inner tube?

    Also, does using tire liners affect the tires in any way at all (aside from keeping me from having flat tires)? I have a mountain bike but I use it only on paved trails.

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    1. Reply

      In my experience, sealing tires tend to be a little heavier then regular tires but they work for small thorns. If you happen to ride over a nail, they never seemed to work. I’ve found it a little harder to fill air into self-sealing tires as well.

      Tire liners are very easy to install if you have tire removal tools. They just slide between the tube and your tire. I have never had problems with them but I have used them with self-sealing tires(used to ride near star thistle patches and killed too many tires). Most tire liners only protect a small section though and if you get a spike through the side, it will still puncture the tube.

      One warning about a tire liner: be sure the liner is secure in place when you put it in before inflating the tire. If the liner is askew, it can pinch the tube and eventually punch a hole in it. Also, most tire liners will throw the balance of your tire off a little.

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  5. Reply

    New Bike Tire, Same Tube? I want to put slick tires on my mountain bike, and I am curious if I need to just buy the tires and use the tubes from my old tires, or do I need new tires and tubes. Thanks for the help.
    Also, what about rims? Same ones from MTB or should I get new rims as well?

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    1. Reply

      The tube should be marked with the range of tire sizes that it’s been designed to fit. If your slicks are within range, use the tube. If the tube is more than a couple of years old, replace it anyway. The last tube I bought was about $3.

      It’s a good idea to carry a spare tube in case of a flat. I carry two.

      HTH

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  6. Reply

    How Do U Change A Popped Tire Tube On A Mountain Bike? Is it different with a road bike?

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    1. Reply

      It’s the same for both. It might be better with a video or something. I’ll try to explain what I do. I hope I’m clear enough that it makes sense.

      1. Take the wheel off of the bike. There is usually a way to unhook the cable from the brakes or a lever to loosen them so the wheel can come off easier.

      2. Let as much air out as possible from the tube so it’s easier to take the tire off.

      3. Squeeze the sides of the tire all the way around so that it isn’t sticking to the rim. This will make it easier to take it off.

      4. If you have tire tools, (These are plastic and about the size of a Popsicle stick) put it in one side of the tire and lift it over the side of the rim. Then put in another one and slide it around the wheel until the tire is half off of the rim. Now you can kind of pull it off. If you don’t have tire tools, you may be able to pull the tire off with your hands by pulling the tire sideways off of the wheel.

      5. Wipe the inside of the tire with a paper towel or something to find/get rid of whatever popped the tube.

      6. Lay the new or patched tube in the tire with no air in it. If you patch the tube, remember to let the glue dry for about 5 minutes before you put the patch on the tube. Seems crazy, but that’s how it’s done.

      7. Put the tube’s air nozzle into the hole in the rim and put both sides of the tire into the rim. Work the tire back into the rim all the way around.

      8. Put air in the tire and put the wheel back on the bike.

      P.S. Benny has a video! Seeing it will be better, so never mind ?

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  7. Reply

    Tire Tube Question. ? Can i put a 700×32 tube on a 700×23 tire

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    1. Reply

      The tubes usually cover a range like 700×27-32 or 700×25-30 or 700c23-28. I find it a bit odd that your tube is 32 precisely with no range.

      Four things that could happen:
      1) the tube will be heavier than needs to be, that may not matter to you
      2) it is very likely that the tube could make folds inside the tire, you will have to be care full not to pinch it in assembly, inflate and deflate several times to allow it to settle fold free
      3) the tube will never inflate to its full extension, because the recommended pressure on the tire will be reached before that, the walls will remain under stretched and the tube wall will stay pretty thick all around
      4) because of point 3, it may be more resistant to punctures and blow outs.

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  8. Reply

    Motorcycle Tire Tubes? Ok I have never changed a tire before on my Yamaha Vstar 650. It’s the rear wheel and I really don’t have any knowledge on this bike at all seeings how it’s my first one. I am doing a lot research now but sometimes this Yahoo answers helps with specific questions: The first, how do I know if my rear tire on my bike has a tube? I was told it did by a tire dealer over the phone…But the main question is, do I also need to change the tube when I change the tire????? It’s worn down and i’m going to attempt to change it myself seeings how I am broke and can’t afford to have it done for me. I really would love to not have to purchase a tube but if its mandatory then obviously I don’t have a choice

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    1. Reply

      The first step is to make you tire total flat and obviously take it off the bike, when you want to see if it does have a tube or not then when the tire is flat try to push the air valve in if it pushes in then its got a tube if it doesn’t even if the tire is flat then it’s tubeless.
      when you got the tire off and totally let all the air out the best way to do this is unscrew the valve and take it out, it’s pretty hard to explain how to do this by writing but i will try my best. when you’ve got everything done you want to take the first side of the tire off try to do this by pushing in one side to the middle of the rim and then if you haven’t got any proper tools use a lever or something to lever out the tire from the opposite side. i don’t know how much this will help but just take it slowly and use common sense, that’s the way i learned how to take tires off.
      all the best ?

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  9. Reply

    What Bicycle Tire Tube Should I Get? The tire name is continental S2000 and says 23 622 700x23c
    i look at for them snd theres 3 different mm for 700x23c, which size do i get?

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    1. Reply

      1. Check the style of stem you have. If it is large like what’s on a car tire it is Schraeder. If it is tall and skinny it’s Presta. Make sure the tube you choose is the correct type.
      2. 700 refers to the diameter of the wheel. Narrow down the selection to 700 types. 27″ is larger and won’t fit as well.
      3. 23c refers to the width and cross section of the tire. Tubes are designed to fit ranges and can easily stretch a little without harm. They often fit 18 – 23c or 18 – 25c tires.

      If you look at the link below you can see a column to narrow down the search to what fits your bike.

      Last, you can always take the wheel to a bike shop and have them help out. They will gladly help you select the right tube for your tire. It’s one of the most common things they do all day and they are expert at it.

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