Here is Polar CS500 Wireless Bike Computer with Heart Rate Monitor and Cadence Sensor

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  1. Reply

    Tchibo Bike Computer? I bought a bike computer from Tchibo and had to bring it back to be swapped because it didn’t work. I got another one and tried it, that also doesn’t work.

    It always shows a speed like 9.9mph although the bike’s stationary.??
    I think everything is set up properly…

    I put the bike computer on the handlebars, attached the magnet to the wheel, put the sensor on the pole-thing next to the wheel spokes…

    And it doesn’t work…I don’t think two after each other wouldn’t work so i must be doing something wrong. What could it be??

    Here’s the link:

    http://www.tchibo.eu/is-bin/INTERSHOP.enfinity/eCS/Store/eu/-/GBP/TdEuDisplayProductInformation-Start;sid=pp-PrsRK6l6Pro1Ki6yFysfSGxt9Drj4XDQ=?ProductSKU=0013064&BackTo=Search

    Thanks

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    1. Reply

      Even if you have the wheel circumference incorrect the computer should indicate zero when the bike is stationery. If the wheel magnet is misaligned it will stop the display from indicating anything. The only other possibility is that the computer is still in settings mode. Read the instructions carefully to make sure this is not the case. If there is nothing wrong with the settings then it is knackered and you should get your money back. Halfords (UK) offer a range of simple computers that I have found to be easy and reliable. Other than this the Cateye computers might be a bit more expensive but work well.

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    • John
    • February 9, 2014
    Reply

    HOw Does A Wireless Bike Computer Work?

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    1. Reply

      Wireless bicycle computers come in various shapes and flavors, but here is a very general overview.

      The computer consists of a receiver which is mounted on the handlebar. On the wheel there is a magnet attached to the spokes and a sensor/transmitter attached to the fork. The transmitter sends a signal to the receiver every time the magnet passes it.

      The receiver, knowing the circumference of the wheel (you tell it this), then counts the number of times the magnet passes the sensor in an elapsed time period and calculates the speed.

      Basically, the wireless ones work in much the same way as the wired ones, but transmitting the information instead of sending it through the wire.

      My wireless computer also keeps track of my heart rate (through a transmitter on my chest) and my cadence (through a transmitter counting my pedal strokes).

      Generally wireless computers are easier to install and look better (no wires threading down your brake cable). Problems can include interference from power lines and interference from other computers. They are much better now, but in early days, if you happened to ride near someone with the same computer brand there was a chance that your speed would double because it would pick up the other guy’s transmissions as well. Nowadays most (all?) wireless computers are coded to avoid this problem.

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    • HUBBS
    • February 11, 2014
    Reply

    Bike Computer? I have a simple Mongoose (wired) bike computer. I accidently reset the computer and of course I don’t have the instructions anymore. I was wondering If anyone knows the four digit code that you have to enter at start up. The bike has a 26″ wheel base
    I tried looking online but couldnt find any info.

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    1. Reply

      I’m pretty sure the code you mention is the tire circumference needed for the computer to calculate speed, distance etc.

      This number depends on the actual tire diameter on your bike they all vary a little. A ball park figure is 2050 to 2090 measured in mm. But you can figure it yourself.

      You need to do a roll-out. You need your bike, a flat, paved surface, tape measure and piece of chalk.

      Make a chalk line on the pavement as a starting line. Put your front wheel on the line with your valve stem exactly strait up over it. Roll your bike in a strait line until the valve stem is exactly strait up again. Mark it carefully with the chalk. Now measure from line to line. This number, should be around 80″ if I remember correctly. Convert to mm (1″ = 25.4 mm). This is the number you need.

      Do this roll-out a couple times, you’ll get a more actuate number. Put this number in your computer.

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  2. Reply

    How To Use Bike Computer With Handlebar Bag? I have denalli road bike can I put my bike computer on with handlebar bag if so how do I do it

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    1. Reply

      Bike computers only take up a very small amount of space. And you can’t find anywhere to mount it either on the handlebar or possibly mount it sideways on the stem? Oh…I forgot. You have a GMC Denali. That bike’s not fast enough to require a bike computer. I passed one about a year ago while COASTING downhill on a hybrid. The other guy was pedaling.

      See links. Mount it on the stem.
      http://www.johnstonefitness.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/bike-computer-installed.jpg
      http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2145/2492760581_83c5481106_b.jpg
      http://www.thebikelist.co.uk/media/156549/strada%20stem_250x375.jpg

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  3. Reply

    Should I Get A Bike Computer? Also known as a Cyclometer or Odometer, should I get a bike computer?

    I have just started Highschool this year and it is about 4-5KM from where my house is. My parents work so the only way to get there is by riding or walking and obviously, biking is the smarter choice. Basically, this means that in 10 days, I can ride 100KM but I wanted to know the REAL stats. Should I get a bike computer or not? Which models do you recommend? It is a 24″ (I think) Mountain Bike if you wanted to know.

    Thanks.

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    1. Reply

      I would say that there isn’t any point for you to get one. First of all, you are basically riding a fixed course every day, so you can measure your exact route a couple of ways, either with google maps, or by asking one of your parents to drive the route and watching the car odometer. Another reason is that high school kids can be real pricks, and there is a very real chance that your bike computer would get stolen or damaged. Another thing is that there is the very real temptation to mess with a cycle computer while you are riding, which is dangerous. Just enjoy the ride instead. Look for something new and different that you haven’t noticed before each day. Getting out on a bicycle is one of the few chances people have in this modern world to take a break from technology and the modern pace of life. Enjoy it.

      Instead of a cycle computer, you would be much better off spending the money on a set of road tires for your mountain bike, keeping the knobby tires on hand for weekend trail rides and whatnot. With road pattern tires, the ride will be a lot smoother, easier, faster, and more enjoyable.

      Cycling is fun and liberating. Don’t worry about trying to quantify every aspect of it. You know about how far you go every day, you can measure the exact route in other ways, and as it doesn’t change, you can figure out your exact distances with a simple application of mathematics.

      Good luck!

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    • Kevin
    • February 16, 2014
    Reply

    Bike Or Computer? I’m already a fit person, I play basketball and run 4 times a week. I use my computer a lot more often than a bike, but on bikes I do tricks and sometimes into the trails when my dad comes to visit from when he takes vacation from work. In the weekdays I usually just bike for 30 minutes on my driveway practicing tricks since I’m not allowed to play games monday-friday (School days). I just watch video and stuff.

    Which one should I buy, I have 800 dollars, which I can buy a good comp or a good bike. Any ideas?

    Thanks

    I’ll use the bike for trail riding (Sometimes), going to school, friend’s house, centrum, amc etc. Computer is for homework, some games, youtube and tlking to friends.

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    1. Reply

      Get the bike.
      It will last longer than a computer as long as you maintain it, and it will only get you in better shape. I would reccomend getting a mid-range mountain bike with front suspension and a hard tail if you want transportation as well as trail riding. If your interested in BMX get a dirt jumper (the kind with bigger tires and one brake). Whatever you do, go to a bike shop not something like sports authority. You’ll be happy you did, and will get much better quality. For $800 you could get quite a nice bike. My reccomendation is unless you plan on getting serious, spend between $300-500 on the bike and save the rest for spending.

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    • Dan
    • February 17, 2014
    Reply

    Whats Is The Best Bike Computer?

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    1. Reply

      What functions do you NEED? Do you need it to be a simple wired model or wireless? Do you need to read “cadence” (pedal rpm) along with other data? The “best” bike computer is the one that meets your needs & no more.

      They start around $15 to $20 at discount stores. A good wired unit with cadence counter can go for $50.
      http://www.walmart.com/search/search-ng.do?search_constraint=4171&Find=Find&_ta=1&search_query=bicycle%20computer&_tt=bicycle computer
      http://www.rei.com/product/751831/cateye-strada-cadence-bike-computer

      A wireless model can go for $100.
      http://www.rei.com/product/853466/cateye-strada-cc-rd410dw-cadence-bike-computer

      If programmed with the correct tire size, they are ALL deadly accurate when it pertains to mileage, speed & time. Get only what you need! Me? I like the wired cadence units. It’s like a tachometer for your feet – pedal rpm.

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