Spend More Time Cycling

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Essentials for cycling

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Cycling In The Rain

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    • Phoenix
    • February 15, 2014

    wear whatever you are going to be comfortable in, you are going to want to get a wide gell seat or you will get sore, however after a couple of days this will go away(if you are planning on riding alot), most importantly wear a helmet, and have alot of fun, you dont need to spend alot of money, the only money i spent was on my bike and my helmet, about the cost it is to fill up an suv, have fun riding and keep the rubber side down.

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    • bikeridedave
    • February 15, 2014

    You will need at a minimum a good quality pair of shorts (do not wear underwear inside shorts), a jersey (a special shirt made just for cycling), cycling shoes, gloves, sunglasses, and last but not least a good helmet to protect your head. And be sure to always wear that helmet when you ride. Experience will be your best teacher as you get into the sport and you will learn what works for you while you are cycling. Start by going to your local bike shop and start asking questions on how best to get started. There are of course plenty of outlets online to buy clothes and other gear that you will eventually need. A quick internet search will show you dozens of websites where you can get just about anything you want. However, now most LBS’s price their gear competitively with most any website and they can provide on the spot service for your gear if you need it.

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    • Fandango
    • February 15, 2014

    Cycling isn’t expensive unless you want all the extra gadgets, gizmos, and outfits. The trick is to be patient and willing to wait for non-essentials until you find a good deal.

    They only things I’d say are essential are a bike and a helmet. You can get a good used bike for a few hundred dollars, and a comfortable helmet for about $ 50. You should also have a bike pump and a patch kit for your tires. If you have more money in a few years, you can always upgrade then.

    After that I’d recommend, non-cotton shirts and pants. Not necessarily biking specific ones, although you may prefer those. The most important difference between cycling non-cotton shirts and non-cycling specific ones is that cycling jerseys go further down in the back, so if you are leaning way over, you still won’t get a sunburned lower back. I’ve never had a problem with this as long as I don’t were really short shirts. The main difference between the shorts is that they are padded. I don’t bother with cycling-specific shorts or tops because of money, and with the amount of riding I do, I just don’t need them.

    I get clothes whenever and wherever I happen to find them cheap. Unless you live in the dessert, synthetics dry much, much faster than cotton, and therefore end up being more comfortable. I’ve found them on sale fairly often at http://www.campmor.com, and at local discount department stores in the sports section.

    I ride for a half-hour commute in the morning, and half and hour to an hour and a half in the evening coming home when I go for longer rides a couple times a week.

    I have got a comfortable saddle, but these seem to vary for everyone. Mine’s a Planet Bike Women’s ARS Bike Seat. This is a large part of the reason I don’t feel the need for bike shorts. The saddle is padded, and I just don’t need double padding.

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    • M V
    • February 15, 2014

    Padded bike shorts are a must if you are going over 3 miles. Wear tennies if you arent clipped in. Tighter shirts lessen wind resistance. I wear whatever I feel like, depending on the weather. Summer; I wear cotton shorts over my biking shorts cuz I like a pockets. If its warm, I wear tank tops(2: one to soak up sweat), if its chilly, I wear a tshirt(White for both T and tank to be seen)…if its cold, I wear a hoodie over my L/S tshirts/base layer.

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    • w w
    • February 15, 2014

    bike wear. spend money to get a good pair of cycling shorts. buy gender specific, and better quality. this is for your comfort! try Assos, Louis Garneau, Specialized, Pearl Izumi. your legs move, this may cause chaeffing. shorts with a good chamois help to reduce chaeffing. save money on your jersey! you don’t need to wear a full kit! no one will think less of you for wearing a boring shirt! you should get an athletic shirt with wicking properties, at least. youll save money getting an under armour t-shirt, if you decide to forego the back pockets on a cycling specific jersey. throw on some moisture wicking socks, your shoes and helmet (again a place I wouldn’t skimp on the price! as you can tell by my verbose, witty and informing answer – my brain is too valuable!) and you’re ready to ride. you can ad other accessories as you go. I’d recomend some good cycling gloves, a rain shirt (get one that breathes and keeps you reasonably dry, not one that breaks your bank! clear plastic jerseys are still good enough for many pros!), arm & knee warmers.. warmer clothes for the cooler months do cost more, so apply the same principles. quality where your body moves frequently, economy where it doesn’t! you can find deals on line and seasonal close outs at your LBS.. now that your wardrobe is set, if you dont have a good saddle, get one. get one with a good fit, and I don’t mean lots padding (this leads to chaeffing again!). you need one that has a low profile, but supports your sit bones. unless you know what works, get fitted at your LBS. a good saddle may cost you some dough, so don’t go trial and error on-line! speaking of on-line, and saving money – only buy what your comfortable making decisions about sight-unseen. or what youve shopped around at a couple of dealers, but found super cheap on-line. otherwise, trial and error will end up costing more!

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