Here is Breezer Uptown Infinity Bike 2013 – Nuvinci Seamless Shifting

Tags: , ,
Previous Post

World Bicycle Relief Cycling Jersey – Black – Men’s Survey

Next Post
l18387.png
Bobs Bicycles Computers + Gps + Hrm

Edge 200 GPS Computer Evaluation

Comments

    • BigA
    • February 6, 2014
    Reply

    Does Your City Have Town Bikes? I overheard these guys on the bus talking about the town bikes. Now, my city doesn’t have the town bike program so they must have been speaking of another city.

    Does your city have town bikes? Can you really just pick one up, ride it and drop it when you’re done…for free?

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Every city I am in has a town bike.

      View Comment
  1. Reply

    I Want To Buy A Mountain Bike To Get Around The City.? I dont want to spend $2000.00 dollars, but I want something better than a $200.00 department store mountain bike. I just want to be able to have something that lasts with good parts, not too heavy and looks nice. But I’m not going to be racing or putting big money into the bike. I might jump a couple curbs, or need to get up a good size hill without the gears messing up. What do you suggest. I may spend between $400-$1000.00. Keep in mind I will be using the bike mostly for busy city areas, but of course if I choose to go riding with the girlfriend I may want to go to a trail on occasion.

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      If by “trail” you mean bike path, MUP, or other smooth surfaced path that may not be paved, you have little to no use for a mountain bike. Suspension forks add to the cost, and that means some of your budget that could have gone to a bike with better wheels or components will be lost on a feature that you’ll never use.

      Let’s say you really want a mountain bike. A hardtail (suspension fork only) would be good for all but the really rough stuff. Get one with a decent fork that features “lockout” or “LO.” Some options under $1K:

      Specialized Rockhopper Disc
      http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=38430&eid=107

      Trek 6000
      http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/mountain_hardtail/6_series/6000/

      Specialized Rockhopper Disc 29
      http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=38431&eid=107
      (The 29er wheels may feel a bit faster on the street)

      If you want something that’s got mountain bike comfort with larger wheels for faster street riding, but understand they’re not for hard trail riding, you could check out something like these:

      Specialized CrossTrail Elite
      http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=38465&eid=125
      (Suspension fork, 700c wheels)

      Trek Navigator 3.0
      http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/bike_path/navigator/navigator30/
      (Suspension fork, 700c wheels, upright riding position)

      Now, let’s say your potential trail riding will be quite civil, and you don’t have a need for a suspension fork. You could get a “flat bar” road bike (or fitness bike) like a Sirrus or FX. These will be a bit lighter and quicker. They can handle a bit larger tire (up to 32 or 35c) than a traditional road bike for more comfort on rough surfaces. But they have 700c road wheels that aren’t meant for jumping curbs or careless riding. They’ll feel more agile that the others listed.

      Specialized Sirrus Elite
      http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=39273&eid=121
      (Carbon fork/seatstays, 700c wheels)

      Trek 7.5FX
      http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/bike_path/fx/75fx/
      (Carbon fork, 700c wheels)

      I’m gonna throw in a couple “urban” bikes that might be of interest. I’ve ridden these bikes and have to admit they’re pretty dang cool. Really comfortable, pretty quick, and perfect for various surfaces. They’re just fun to ride, and I’d pick one up if I had a place for it (and some extra money). The Utopia and Kaitai have suspension forks and 700c wheels.

      Gary Fisher Utopia
      http://fisherbikes.com/bike/model/utopia

      Gary Fisher Kaitai
      http://fisherbikes.com/bike/model/kaitai

      Gary Fisher Cronus
      http://fisherbikes.com/bike/archivemodel/440
      I guess Fisher quit making the Cronus for 2009. Tougher 26″ wheels, with a rigid fork and single chainring to keep the price down. 9sp cassette still had plenty of range.

      Jamis also makes some bikes worth looking at, including the Coda series.

      If you just want to enjoy riding and get some exercise and fresh air, you don’t have to spend a fortune. Any of the bikes I mentioned have good bits and pieces that will last, given some basic maintenance and care. All have plenty of gearing for hills. That’s really a bummer if the Cronus has been discontinued.

      View Comment
  2. Reply

    What Would Constitute A Good City Bike? Howdy all,

    I live in the Capitol Hill neighbourhood of Denver and I am looking for a good bike that would allow an attachment on the back for various cargo, such as grocery shopping, can handle hills well, since I would like to commute to Auraria Campus where I’m a student.

    Any ideas?

    Sincerely,
    Jessica

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Hey Jessica,
      I will start by saying what to stay away from. There are two things and they are, in this order, tires with aggressive tread and mountain bikes. With that out of the way you should look for a fairly light weight model “road” bike that allows for a rack to be attached to the rear. Almost all can have an attachment on the front. Any local bike shop (LBS) can help you see what to look for on the rear of the bike.
      Handling hills is really all in you. If your legs are strong it will not seem so bad. However, one thing that will help you out is having an gear in the front. More gears on your cassette, the gears in the rear, will offer more variations but not necessarily assist you very much. Lastly you want smooth tires and avoid shocks. Shocks will absorb some of your effort making you more tired overall while not giving back much since roads are normally not full of pot holes. The slick tires will ensure that you are getting almost all of the forward force that you put into the peddles. I have given this advice many times while working at bike shops. I hope it helps.

      James

      View Comment
  3. Reply

    Which Kind Of Bike Is Faster: Mountain Bike Of City Bike? Since boyhood I have always used a mountain bike despite the fact that I always road it on the sidewalk. I prefer a mountain bike because it looks better to me, I like the handle bar design better, and I like being able to switch gears. I always noticed however that I was going slower than people in the street on city bikes. When I buy a bike in the future, I want to buy a mountain bike but I will rarely ride it off road. Should I just buy a city bike for the more convenient speed or are they not that much faster than mountain bikes?

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Raz

      A hybrid bike offers most of those features that you like in your mountain bike. But, it will be much faster because 1) it is a much lighter frame 2) thinner smooth road tires 3) higher road gearing.

      You can get some of the advantage out of a mtn bike by converting the tires to smooth road type tires. But, if you have suspension you would need to be able to lock it out. You would still have a heavy bike, with mtn gearing

      One cannot speak of speed, because IF you were in great shape you could be as fast as many of those riders on a road bike BUT we can speak of efficiency A road bike is 20 to 30% more efficient than a mountain bike. So not matter the measurement you are either working a whole lot harder for the same speed…. or trying to get into 30% better shape riding your mtn bike in the weekly roadie group rides!

      Soccerref

      View Comment

Leave a Reply